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Crop Tours Finds Two Different Indiana Crops

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crop tourOn Monday, the Pro-Farmer crop tour started in Ohio where crops looked great and corn yields were estimated close to 190 bpa. Mark Bernard, who is leading the eastern leg of the tour, said the crops in Ohio were some of the best he has ever seen in that state. But as the tour crossed into Adams, Jay, and Blackford Counties in Indiana, they found a much different situation. Ty Higgens, Ohio Ag Network farm broadcaster, told HAT the Eastern Indiana crops had some issues, “As soon as we crossed that state line, we started seeing some real pressure on the soybeans in the form of Sudden Death Syndrome.” He also reported a good deal of tip back in the corn, “You can see the crop is in need of some moisture.”

 

Tipton County
Tipton County

On Tuesday, the group moved into Central and Northwestern IN and found the crops much improved. Higgens said, “As the group moved in to Tipton, Clinton, Tippecanoe, and Warren counties, we were seeing averages of 190 bpa on corn.”  He reported soybean pod counts were running about 1500 pods for a 3×3 area.  Upon entering Clinton County he reported, “We found another great corn crop. I am really surprised that we are not seeing ‘tip-back’ this morning like we did yesterday when we arrived in the Hoosier State. The ground is by no means moist, but they must’ve gotten a little more rain here that other parts of the state. Some wind too as we came across some green snap. Our estimate is 195.8 bpa.”

 

Clinton County
Clinton County

The tour’s last stop in Indiana was in Warren County where he reported corn yield of 221 bpa, “Some of the best corn we have seen today.”  But Higgens admits most on the tour are not putting a lot of stock in the yield numbers because the crops are so far behind  in development, “The numbers look good right now but, if this crop does not get some rain in the next few weeks, these numbers could change significantly.”

 

 

In addition, some late season disease issues are showing up across Indiana. Stephanie Smith, agronomist with DuPont Pioneer, says this is especially true in the northern part of the state, “We are going to have a lot of stalk issues this fall. We had a lot of rain this spring so our nitrogen is essentially gone.” She said, with any strong winds this fall, there will be considerable lodging in many fields.  She also reported that white mold is breaking out in many fields in northern part of the state.

 

Pro Farmer Senior Market Analyst and eastern Tour Director Brian Grete noted, “When all of the route samples were tabulated, the Ohio Tour yield was up a whopping 55% from year-ago, but I question how much of that yield potential this corn crop can maintain into harvest. Our yield calculations increased as we moved across the border into Indiana. Corn samples along my route came in at an average of 179.8 bu. per acre. In my opinion, the Eastern Indiana corn crop has a better chance of holding onto its yield potential than the Ohio crop.”  Bernard said, “Bean pod counts (on my route) were extremely variable from a high of 1,670 in a 3’x3’ (square) in Ohio’s Paulding County to a low of 360 pods in Wyandot County. Unlike last year, soil moisture had not been a major limiting factor up until recently, and there is potential for the crop to lose bushels with no rain.”

 

crop tour mapThe tour crossed into IL on Tuesday at Vermillion County. “Our first stop here was less than impressive,” reported Higgens. “‘Tip-back’ here was significant and the dirt was a dry as we’ve seen. The cracks prove it. Our corn estimate for this Vermillion field was 165bpa and the bean pod count was 876. Illinois redeemed itself in Champaign County where we found a corn field that we project will yield 230 bushels per acre. In the beginning stage of dent and very healthy from the stalk up.”