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Most Planters Still Not Running in Indiana

 

headshots_0002_Emmert_DanThe rains in Indiana have not been as significant as predicted this week so some field drying has taken place, especially in Northern Indiana. There have even been some reports of scattered planting activity, but that has not been the case in the Southwest part of the state.  “There has been almost no field activity in this part of the state so far this growing season,” Dan Emmett, field agronomist with  DuPont Pioneer in SW Indiana, told HAT. “A few guys were out just before Easter, but since then the rains have kept fieldwork at a standstill.”

 

He said growers are anxious to get into the fields, but he urged patience, “I recommend the soil has to be at least 50 degrees, and planting just before a rain is also not a good idea.” He said growers should wait for a break in the showers, “A cold rain within 24 to 48 hours of planting can cause some serious emergence issues.” He added that a wet seed bed is also to be avoided.

 

With very little field work having been done, Emmett says growers will face some tough decisions when the rain does stop, “They are going to have to decide if they are going to put on anhydrous pre-plant which will mean they will have to wait to plant to avoid seedling injury.” Some growers may opt to forgo this application in order to get the seeds in the ground and come back later with an application.

 

Emmett says it is not time to push the panic button yet, “It is only the middle of April, so we still have plenty of time.” He said, in 2013, corn in his area did not get planted until the end of May and yields were still good.  With more rain in the forecast for Southern Indiana next week, it is unlikely that fieldwork will begin for at least another week.

 

More details on the agronomy page at our web site and mobile app, sponsored by DuPont Pioneer.